Big Guns Require Better Shooters

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Pablo Edronkin

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As firepower, calibre or mass of a gun is increased, the experience of its owner or user should increase accordingly; big firearms are not for beginners.

Within the realm of firearms enthusiasts it is often said that .22 guns are for true specialists because only they can balance the relative lack of power of that calibre with their experience, turning such firearms into acceptably effective weapons. The other side of the coin in this argument is that beginners should use big guns to lessen the effets of their lack of aim, lack of reflexes, misuse of ammunition, and so on.


Large weapons like this rocket launcher frequently cause the shooter to adopt uncomfortable and vulnerable shooting postures.
Large weapons like this rocket launcher frequently cause the shooter to adopt uncomfortable and vulnerable shooting postures.

This is almost a truth accepted by many and even depicted in pictures, but the cas seems quite diferent in my opinion. Big bore guns will not necessarily be in the best hands when talking about inexperienced owners:

- A big calibre gun develops a far greater recoil than a small one and it is thus harder to control, and fear of this is one of the main obstacles for developing good shooting habits. Thus, giving a beginner a big gun is likely to produce a shooter that is actually afraid of the way a gun kicks; not good for precision indeed.

- Bigger bore guns tend to be heavier and larger; that makes it carrying, handling and storing them more difficult and that in turn leads to laxitude simply because inexpert users will soon find such big, heavy things quite cumbersome. From there to an accident there is a sort distance, and in any case it also leads to unreadiness, meaning that beginners in such a position will rarely have their guns prepared to be used at any moment´s notice.

- Carrying big guns means transporting bulkier, heavier ammo; a thousand .22 cartridges cause less trouble than a thousand 7,62 NATO rounds. Thus, carrying bigger guns invariably entails less ammunition reserves. In the event of combat, inexperts that also are less efficient at hiting targets will empty their reserves too quickly.

- Bigger guns are more expensive - gneerally speaking - than small ones; they are also more sophisticated and require better mainteinance and handling. A beginner would probably waste his money buying a weapon that will turn to be unforgiving with his lack of experience.

- Using a bigger, more powerful weapon in a combat situation entails more difficulties: Moving around is harder, especially in confined spaces, an dshooting with it requires exposing the bodi more than in the case of smaller arms.

These are briefly, some of the reasons why I think that big guns are not for beginners.


Notice how the operator has to expose himself a lot more to fire such a large weapon than in the case of small armas users.
Notice how the operator has to expose himself a lot more to fire such a large weapon than in the case of small armas users.



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