P. Edronkin

A View On Our Global Years



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Since globalisation has become fashionable things have become a little confuse; first of all because the thing that has acquired global proportions in the fastest way is the financial stream of money from here and there in such a way as to help corporation reduce their costs at the expense of jobs and society in general. Terrorism has also acquired global proportions, albeit this process is not entirely related to economic factors but indeed, if the global economy continues its unfair and frankly suicidal course, it will be closely related in the future.

Richness has not acquired global proportions so far: no money is pouring from the profits of corporations. Salaries are not higher but lower, and this is being camouflaged under the pretension of competitiveness, and the distance between rich and poor is becoming larger and larger, which is a true recipe for serious social trouble in the future.

The transit of people has not acquired global proportions either: in fact, today is more difficult and more expensive to travel with all those stupid visa requirements, biometric passports and such fancy and useless stuff. However, we have global new ailments like AIDS and bird flu, not to mention the greenhouse and global warming.

The price of oil has risen globally too in a very irrational way because while it is understandable that the crude pumped out by companies that accompanied the 'liberating' efforts of the U.S> government is much higher than normal, common sense says that the oil taken out of the North Sea or Venezuela shouldn't have the same costs. But the fact that crude is a 'commodity' suits perfectly the interests of a few in contempt of the rest of the planet, because normal, rational and simply sensible economic principles should be at work here but are not: if oil from the Persian Gulf is so expensive because those countries are so irresponsible - plus the United States - then, their produce should not be in the market, and Venezuelans, Norwegians, Russians and so on should be flooding the world with their oil barrels, just like what happens when you go to a supermarket and find out that the shampoo coming from some company becomes horribly expensive who knows why, and you simply buy another one!

I think that it is time for us all to change a few thing regarding our economy. Things like the idea of a commodity work well to simplify inefficient production and make no distinction in quality and costs; inefficient producers, like the U.S. companies sucking the oil in Iraq, or European farmers should simply be taken out of the market: there is no shortage of opportunities in the United States and Europe to make money in other ways. Others can produce better products at a fair price.

Besides consumerism is consuming our planet, and if we become a little more conscious of what we are doing and the way in which we irresponsibly spend energy by buying things that we don't need and later discard, we would do ourselves a great service, not to mention future generations.




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