Why A Labyrinth?

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Pablo Edronkin

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What are the reasons to build a stone maze carrying thousands of rocks from one place to another and forming walls with them? Madness? Art? Explorer´s spirit?

The few people that before the publication of this series of articles on the Blanco Labyrinth learned about our little hobby up there reacted as if we were a little bit out of normal wavelenghts. Some thought that it was pure madness, the feat of masochists, a waste of time and so on; however, far from that, we believe that the construction of the Blanco stone labyrinth is a positive thing, first of all, for ourselves, the ones that are constructing it, as well as for anyone willing to go and find it (we leave that as homework for you).


We went searching for wood, but ended doing something entirely different.
FWe went searching for wood, but ended doing something entirely different.

And the reason for our positivenes son the matter is just a question of pint of view: Instead of asking ourselvews why? One day we said why not?

Such an endeavour that means carrying literally tons of heavy rocks, thousands of them to form pircas as solid as modern-day bunkers in a place as isolated as the Blanco valley serves well to prove one point: Nobody goes there because so far, this hard-to-pass-by thing remained unreported. This is indeed proof that the valley is not populated, as some claim, but fo us this is a compeltely secondary, alost collateral, cosnequence of its existence that began taking shape in 1998.

We had numerous ideas about it but finally put one into practice without any planning, spontaneously, as we went to a place to look for wood for our cam fire. We saw that the place from which we began collecting dry branches and combustible remains was a good one to actually make a camp, and so we moved there and built a small stone shelter of the kind that we usually construct. Then we decided to stay for a night, and the next morning we saw that the place was good but there was a little bit too much wind were we sat to hav emate tea and talk.


Maybe this condor that approached us - the legendary eagle of Zeus´ according to the Spanish conquistadores - mumbled us to make something else other than just be there.
Maybe this condor that approached us - the legendary eagle of Zeus´ according to the Spanish conquistadores - mumbled us to make something else other than just be there.

So we decided to build a small pirca, or Inca wall to stop the wind, and when it was done we decided to improve its performance by lengthening it a bit, and from there to star t building pircas in all directions there was only a small, almost unnoticeable plunge of will.

We can really make the labyrinth as big as we want for it is located where no one lives. There are no boundaries except our minds and perhaps not even that, for we know that we will never finish it. Who knows? It may be lost in the night of time, but its solid construction will make it last, or maybe, it will become a project for generations to come.


On the right place appeared a shelter... then more walls... and then a labyrinth.
On the right place appeared a shelter... then more walls... and then a labyrinth.



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