P. Edronkin

Patagonia (I).



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'...In calling up images of the past, I find that the plains of Patagonia frequently cross before my eyes; yet these plains are pronounced by all wretched and useless. They can be described only by negative characters; without habitations, without water, without trees, without mountains, they support only a few dwarf plants. Why, then, and the case is not peculiar to myself, have these arid wastes taken so firm a hold of my memory?I can scarcely analyse these feelings; but it must be partly owing to the free scope given to the imagination. The plains of Patagonia are boundless, for they are scarcely passable, and hence unknown; they bear the stamp of having thus lasted, as they are now, for ages, and there appears no limit to their duration thorough future time...'

-Charles Darwin.

Patagonia is a narcotic. Whenever you are here you would whish to be somewhere else, and when you are somewhere else, you would whish you were here.

A region with a weather described as 'infernal' by Paul Theroux, Patagonia is located on the southernmost part of the American continent (Speaking about 'The Americas' or 'America' and 'Latin America' is intrinsically wrong both in geographical, geological as well as historical terms).

Patagonia belongs today to Argentina and Chile, albeit the Falkland/Malvinas Islands and South Georgia archipelago disputed between Britain and Argentina are part of the region as well, and we can't avoid mentioning the odd existence of the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia, which really existed during the second half of the nineteenth century in order to complete its map.

First picture at Mount Hensley.
This picture was the first ever taken at Mount Hensley, during
the first visit ever made by humans. This peak was firstly
climbed by Luciano Marcer, Gustavo Sakuda, Federico Ferrero
and myself. I took the picture facing the northeastern valleys,
right at the border of the former Kingdom of Araucania.



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